Rejection is just a delayed success – story of Brian Acton

You probably have read today that Facebook bought Messenger Application WhatApps for $16 Billion http://t.co/D13MY1KLkh

Yeah, that is a HUGE money, but i’m not gonna discuss about that gigantic transaction. My focus of this writing is the guy called Brian Acton

In the middle of 2009, Brian Acton was the software engineer that no one wanted to hire. Despite a dozen years of experience at Yahoo and Apple Computer, he got turned down by two of the Internet’s brightest stars at the time.

First Twitter said no in May. Then Facebook rejected him in August.

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When Acton couldn’t find work at another big-name company, he took his chances on the start-up route instead. Teaming up with another Yahoo alum, Jan Koum, he helped build WhatsApp, a Mountain View, Calif., start-up that has become the king of cloud-based messaging.

Today WhatsApp is in the headlines this week because Facebook has agreed to buy the company for a stunning $16 billion in stock and cash, along with as much as $3 billion in restricted stock units for the founders.

Learning from the above story, yes, i fully agree Rejection sucks, but it’s not the end of the world. In fact, rejection is a part of success. People who avoid rejection don’t get hurt or disappointed, but neither do they feel accomplished or successful.

No one likes to hear “no”, but you can’t achieve your goals without taking a risk. you shouldn’t feel hurt or question your value. You might need to improve your presentation or skills.

In career and business, “no” isn’t always “no”. Sometimes “no” means, “not now,” “maybe,” or “more information is needed. Timing and talking to the right person can play a part in getting hired or making a sale. Just because one person said “no” doesn’t mean everyone will. So shake off the rejection and move forward with the attitude that you’re weeding through nos to find the yeses.

When one door closes, another opens; but we often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door that we do not see the one which has opened for us.

We don’t always have control over some unfortunate events, but we can exercise control over our mind and attitude. When one of these things happens, and we focus our attention on the loss – the closed door, we see only a closed door with the resultant frustration and unhappiness.

If we could only move our sight and attention away from the closed door, we might be surprised to discover new, open doors which might lead to greater success !

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About Gabriel Montadaro

Vice President in one of Multinational companies by day and Night Rider After Dark, A humble servant of God, a curious Traveller, hopelessly romantic, You talk - I listen
This entry was posted in Business, history, leadership, marketing, motivation, Opinion, sales, social media and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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